Home
About Us
Is Your Child Sick?
Our Services
New Patients
Forms and Policies
Medical Resources
   Medical Conditions
   What's Going Around?
   Medical Library
      Emergencies
      Newborns
      Breastfeeding
         Breastfeeding Resources
         Collecting and Storing Breast Milk
         Engorged Breasts
         Fluoride
         Formula, Supplementing with
         Getting Started
         Herbal Remedies and Supplements
         Herbs to Avoid While Nursing
         How do I know my baby is getting enough milk?
         Jaundice, Breast Milk
         Mastitis
         Nipple, Cracked
         Nipples, Sore
         Thrush
         Vitamins
         Water
         Weaning
         Weaning, Tips
         Weight Gain and Newborns
         Weight Gain, Slow
         Weight, Appropriate for Babies
         When a Nursing Mother is Ill and Needs to Take Medications
      Parenting Tips
      Immunizations
      Child Behavior
      Special Needs
      Teens
      Helpful Links
Contact Us

Practice News

Currently, there are no announcements.

Is Your Child Sick?TM

Weaning, Tips

This article is an excerpt from "The Nursing Mother's Problem Solver" by Claire Martin.
  • Change the routine. Have Dad take over the bedtime or nursing-time tasks that Mom formerly handled (dressing, reading stories).
  • Take the weaning child for a long car ride at nursing time.
  • Introduce a "transition object"-a toy, lullaby tape or book, for example-at 12 to 15 months, so the baby learns to associate something besides nursing with going to sleep. This will make it much easier to wean your baby.
  • Offer a snack-juice and a favorite food-at nursing time.
  • The favorite nursing sessions (e.g., morning and bedtime) should be last to go.
  • Manage engorged breasts with a "bra salad"-raw cabbage leaves tucked between your breast and the bra.
  • Manually express as much milk as you can when you feel painfully full.
  • Sleep in a stretchy exercise bra, with nursing pads to soak up leaking milk. It's not unusual to leak for more than a month after weaning. Some women's breasts still produce a drop or two of milk more than a year after they wean their baby.